Why I Started Biking Again Part One

The shorter bit:

I work at a company that does a lot of things, many of which I don’t like and a few I do. One of the things that keeps me able to look at myself in the mirror every morning before going there is this new thing that some of my developers work on an e-commerce site for, that finally got close enough to the finish line to be publicized.

I’m supposed to get a test vehicle for this at some point, but it’s been delayed a long time already, so who knows. But I’m working back up my bike stamina for it assuming I’ll eventually get the thing. In order to do it justice, I’m supposed to use it 3 days a week; which for me means 3 commutes a week; and on this route to my office which has no showers1, that means electric’ing it in the morning and pedalling on the way home, which means my current bus-in bike-out plan is actually very good practice. And I just completed 3 workdays in a row of that (F, M, T) and my legs want to die. The enb.

Go here, enter, and if you win, buy me a goddamn beer you animal.

(Part Two of Why Now is coming whenever I get bored enough to write it).


  1. thanks, you awful CIO 

“Please do what we want, or we’ll ask nicely again!”

This group is a perfect example of what I was talking about in my last crackplog: the survey is a complete waste of time; simply gathering support for all of Capital Metro’s long-range plans while never asking “hey, shouldn’t we be telling Capital Metro to build some reserved-guideway transit for the densest parts of Austin”?

There’s a kickoff event happening in October for this group (or another one with the same name; hard to tell) in which the mayors of Austin and Leander will be participating. Note: Leander already got their reserved-guideway transit. The obviously much less important Central Austin got squat.

People will get co-opted by this group, just like they did by the useless public meetings in which critical things like the canopy style for commuter rail stations were hashed out, and as a result, there’s no counterbalance to Mike Krusee telling Capital Metro what to do.

If Mayor Wynn is truly serving the interests of Austin residents and taxpayers, he’ll end this now by using this group’s forum to push for what Austin needs – but I doubt very much that he will; otherwise he wouldn’t be falling prey to the false promise of regionalism here (the note just reeks of it). As pointed out by another blog I read and trust, regionalism is often the enemy of good public transportation. Leander has no real interest in making sure that Austin taxpayers get real rail transit; they already GOT theirs.

Please join me for the kickoff event to launch the Alliance for Public Transportation. The Alliance is the initiative of Mayors Will Wynn and John Cowman of Leander. Several months ago, they asked a group of people to come together and figure out whether we needed an entity that would consider transportation issues from a regional perspective and across the array of interest groups affected by public transportation and its potential in the Austin area. We said we do!

Please come to our kickoff celebration on October 19th at 6 pm at Nuevo Leon. An invitation is attached with all the details, along with another document that describes the Alliance. I’d also like to take this opportunity to invite you or your organization to become a member and be acknowledged at the event as a “groundbreaker”.

This is going to be an exciting event, with Mayors Wynn and Cowman present, as well as other elected officials and people who care about transportation and the community. I also think the creation of this organization will provide a valuable voice for neighborhoods as we consider public transportation in our region over the coming years.