Poor Little Rich Girl

So if you had two candidates for city office in a city where campaign laws limit donations to a fairly modest sum to prevent undue influence by the rich, and you saw a story like this one:

(Candidate B) appears to be gaining ground. She raised $44,885 in the past few weeks, loaned her campaign another $40,000[…]
(Candidate A) has raised nearly $170,000 since the fall — nearly $100,000 of it from early January to early April, the period reflected in Thursday’s finance reports.

which one of those candidates do you think the media could, responsibly and rationally, call the “little guy” or the “establishment candidate”? Which one do you think would be painted as the rich one in bed with the old money in Austin, and which one do you think would be painted as the voice of the masses?


Well, you’d be wrong.
Randi Shade has gotten more people to donate money to her – and Kathie Tovo, the supposed ‘voice of the neighborhoods’, is loaning herself money that most of us couldn’t afford to get to a run-off. Shade has deeper and broader support among the population as a whole, obviously, while Tovo is relying on the fact that the Austin Neighborhoods Council, the most conservative political entity in the city representing purely the interests of the wealthiest central homeowners, is a turnout machine especially in the lowest-turnout elections (run-offs).


Statesman story


Wait a minute, I hear you saying, the Austin Neighborhoods Council? Conservative? Rich?


It’s a dirty little secret, occasionally alluded to even in the horribly biased Austin Chronicle, that the Austin Neighborhoods Council is really representing what one of their writers called the landed gentry. For instance, as I wrote back in the days of the McMansion Ordinance in this post:

Continue reading “Poor Little Rich Girl”

Connecting some dots

1. Austin Neighborhoods Concil minutes, 10/22/2008:

Live Music Task Force – Saundra Kirk, draft recommendations to be discussed in
a public forum on Wednesday, October 29, 7:30-9:30 pm, City Council Chambers.
Report will be finalized at the task force’s final meeting on November 10, presented to
City Council November 20. Saundra Kirk and Scott Trainer noted that the sound control
recommendations are inadequate.
Jeff Jack moved and motion was seconded
Motion 1
“Authorize the ANC executive committee to draft a letter of concern to the task force
and City Council regarding the task force sound control recommendations.”
The motion passed without opposition.
The task force’s draft report is available on the City of Austin Web site under “Live
Music Task Force.”

2. Austin Neighborhoods Council minutes, 6/27/2007

Noise Solutions Committee Update (Scott Trainer)
City formed a committee to identify improvements to enforcement that could be made under the current
ordinance. 1. APD is retraining police and increasing the number of meters from 2 to 23. 2. The
committee is focusing on the effect of outdoor music on residents and educating the city’s Music
Commission on the need for mitigation. 3. Fire Department is assisting in crowd control, and PACE
(includes AFD, APD, TABC, code enforcement) is coordinating permitting and enforcement through
Municipal Court. APD will be contacting NAs and giving presentations on changes

3. Past list of ANC presidents, excerpted:

Past ANC Presidents
2008 Danette Chimenti
South River City Citizens
2006 – 2007 Laura Morrison
OWANA
2004-2005 Susan Pascoe
WANG
2003 Bryan King
South Lamar NA
2001 – 2002 Jim Walker
Cherrywood NA
1999 – 2000 Will Boseman
NUNA
1997 – 1998 Jeff Jack
Zilker NA

4. From yesterday’s entry, courtesy of Gary Etie: (and updated per his update):

In this video, City Council member Laura Morrison, who was instrumental in passing the Amendment that was specifically used against Shady Grove, points out that the problem was that “Shady Grove’s Permit had expired”. What Ms Morrison fails to point out is that the
March 23rd expiration date was part of (see correction and update in latest post) problems that are now coming around are related to the specific details contained in Amendments that she ramrodded through on March 12th 2009, on the consent agenda (!), as an Emergency item (!), right before SxSW, when anyone involved in the music business was going to be too busy to rally opposition. I don’t think the problem is going to go away, until Ms. Morrison either gets it, and stops carrying the ball for the voter block she wants to retain, or is removed from the process, through recall.. I think Ms. Morrison is that good, at manipulation of the planning process, and it’s that serious, in determining the future of music, in Austin.

5. From the day before:

Jeff Jack, President of Zilker Neighborhood Association and member of Austin Neighborhood Council discussed some of the local clubs in his neighborhood. He supports a balance between music and livability. The City’s current sound ordinance is ineffective, especially with a growing downtown, making entertainment districts important. Also, defined hours of operation are essential and should be limited near residential areas. Venue owners need to agree to restrictive covenants. At 85 DB, the loudness of sound is detrimental to hearing. Austin Bergstrom Airport can not have residences within a certain distance because of associated noise. Enforcement is an issue, sometimes police do not respond to a complaint in a timely manner or after the police have left, the music is cranked back up. It would be ideal if music people served as their own monitors. He would like the Live Music Task Force to develop new rules and take into consideration tougher penalties and a special zoning classification for music.

ANCTALK and Wal-Mart and Northcross

Saved for posterity since Yahoo is flaking out; possibly of some marginal interest here. This is in response to a post by Susan Moffat, fighting against Wal-Mart at Northcross Mall. The point answered by #1 was a study that correlated Wal-Marts with poverty at the county level.


my post:


I hate Wal-Mart too, especially after having to shop at one this weekend up here in Michigan (absence had made the heart grow slightly less contemptuous, I guess), but get real.

  1. The studies you quote could just as easily have shown that Wal-Mart is attracted to poverty-stricken rural areas. IE, they didn’t control for the pre-existing conditions.
  2. I agree that Costco is a million times better than Wal-Mart, but I bet Allandale and the ANC would fight Costco too. If not, let’s see them put their money where their mouth is and draft a letter asking Costco to please move in to this location.
  3. If somebody better is not an option, Wal-Mart is certainly an improvement over what’s there now. The mall is just pathetic – and only getting worse. How about for once hitching your wagon to the market instead of fighting against it and calling Wal-Mart’s bluff – offer to at least abstain if the physical building layout is more urban and pedestrian-supportive than what exists there today, for instance.

ANC meeting notes

outline from Austin Neighborhoods Council panel, which included myself (in opposition), Sam Archer from Cap Metro, David Foster and Jim Walker on the pro-plan side, and ROAD guy Jim Skaggs also in opposition (but presenting the Neanderthal anti-rail-yes-even-light-rail opposition):

  1. Didn’t get to use half-bridge analogy. Time was my enemy.
  2. Pro-transit people continue to swallow the “if we don’t pass this we’ll never get another chance” kool-aid – mention 2000 failed and we’re here in ’04, so obviously a different rail plan could be put up in ’06 or ’08
  3. Despite that, preparing for loss and documenting historical record (ala Shoal Creek) to try to slightly reduce rail’s forthcoming dark ages in Austin
  4. Feeling very very dirty at sharing a podium with Jim Skaggs and getting occasional nods from Gerald Daugherty, whose bald-faced lies contributed to light rail’s 00 defeat. Their ability to good-ole-boy it up with the pro-transit guys reminds me of why I’ll never succeed at a higher-level in politics.

More to come when I eat lunch at desk.