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Austin Bicycling in Austin I Told You So Personal The Shoal Creek Debacle Walking in Austin (Pedestrian Issues) When Neighborhoods Go Bad

Shoal Creek Updates

I will hopefully move some of this content to my old moldy Shoal Creek Debacle Page when I get time.

Brief introduction: Prior to around 2000, Shoal Creek Boulevard was a minor arterial roadway with extensive bicycle traffic in fairly wide bike lanes which allowed parking (which presented a problem, since modern engineering practice does not allow parking in bike lanes). Shoal Creek’s turn came in the “put up no-parking signs in bike lanes” carousel, and the city came up with a plan to preserve on-street parking on one side of the street. The neighbors freaked; a consultant came up with a ridiculous cyclist-killer proposal; the city rejected it; and then a small group of neighborhood people came up with the idea to just stripe a wide “shared lane” for parked cars, cyclists, and pedestrians. With curb extensions to theoretically slow traffic, although since the extensions don’t go out to the travel lane (so cyclists can pass), their effect is likely to be minimal.

Here’s some stuff that’s been happening recently:

  1. The neighborhoods’ email groups (allandale and rosedale) have been full of complaints about the curb extensions, as well as observations about bad driver behavior, including running over and up onto curb extensions. Additionally, neighbors have complained that the bike lane stripe (separating the bike lane from the parking lane) never got put in, which shows that some people didn’t realize that the awful Gandy plan was shelved when no engineers would sign on to it. Finally, motorists have (as I predicted) been using the shoulder as a driving or passing lane.
    Gandy’s plan, endorsed by the neighborhood:

    The current striping is basically the image above, with no stripe separating the bike lane and parking lane.

  2. Neighbors still think there’s a “bike lane” here. There isn’t. There’s a shoulder, with insufficient space in which to safely pass parked cars. (the absence of the stripe separating the 10 feet into 4 and 6 a la the Gandy plan doesn’t change the geometry here – bicyclists must still enter the travel lane in order to safely pass a parked vehicle).
    Images copied from Michael Bluejay:


  3. Motorists are still expecting cyclists to stay in the bike lane. I rode home down Shoal Creek on Monday, and had some indications of impatient motorists behind me as I passed parked cars (no honking this time at least). Remember that even when there’s a bit more room than in the pictures above, you still have to worry about the dooring problem. Even the city compromise with parking on one side had this problem (although to a far lesser degree).
  4. Parked car and passing car conflicts continue to be high. Many people who supported this debacle from the beginning are still cowering behind the idea that since parked cars are “scarce” (average of ten on each side for the entire stretch from Foster to 38th), that we don’t need to worry about the passing conflicts. The problem, however, is that due to the higher speeds of automobiles, there is a very high chance of conflict on each one of those passes, meaning that it is very likely that a motorist will slow down and wait behind a passing cyclist on each pass. In fact, on Monday, my experience was that 4 out of the 5 times I performed this passing manuever, there were motorists stuck behind me by the time I went back into the shoulder area; and the fifth time I found myself stuck while a car passed me (I didn’t get out into the lane early enough).
  5. People continue to misrepresent this process as a compromise (implying that cyclists got something, parking motorists got something, drivers got something, neighborhood got something, etc). In fact, any rational observer can compare conditions before this change to conditions now and make the following judgement: Parking won. Period. Cyclists got less than they had before, and far less than they should have had. The neighborhood got curb extensions (even though they won’t work). Cyclists got the middle finger.
  6. The City Council member most responsible for this debacle, Jackie Goodman, is being term-limited out of office. Unfortunately, I hold little hope that a stronger (i.e. decision-maker rather than consensus-hoper) member will emerge from the pack seeking election.
  7. Neighborhood troublemakers are still misrepresenting the history of this debacle; failing to mention that the original proposal from the city for this roadway preserved on-street parking on one side of the road, which is more than almost any minor arterial roadway (SCB’s original classification) has, and about average for collectors (SCB’s new neighborhood-forced underclassification). This city proposal represented a substantial compromise of bicycle interests, but because it didn’t preserve ALL on-street parking, several malcontent nincompoops in the neighborhood fought it bitterly.
  8. The same neighborhood troublemakers continue to misrepresent Shoal Creek’s role in the city’s transportation system. SCB was originally (correctly) classified as a minor arterial, which means that its main purpose is not for property access, but for a combination of traffic collection/distribution and small amounts of through traffic. For cyclists, SCB is a critical transportation link, since it’s so long, and has right-of-way at all intersections (meaning it never has a 2-way stop where through traffic doesn’t stop; everything’s either a 4-way stop or traffic light). SCB was reclassified thanks to neighborhood pressure to a “residential collector” around 2001ish, against my objections (I-TOLD-YOU-SO-MARKER: I told the other members of the UTC at the time that this change would make it easier for them to then prevent no-parking-in-bike-lanes). Also note that this makes SCB, by far, the longest collector roadway in the city. The neighborhood, ever since then, has claimed that SCB is a “residential street”, which means something very different from “residential collector”. A “residential street” is supposed to serve property access first, parking second, and distribution a distant third, with essentially no provision for through traffic. A “residential collector”, on the other hand, is supposed to serve distribution first, property access second, through traffic third, and parking last.
    The original city plan, preserving on-street parking on one side:

  9. (Humor value only): One of the malcontent neighborhood nincompoops has surfaced again on my old fan group (from my undergraduate days; no, I didn’t make it).
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Austin Don't Hurt Us Mr. Krusee, We'll Do Whatever You Want Driving in Austin Funding of Transportation I Told You So Republicans Hate Poor People Republicans Hate Public Transportation Republicans Hate The Environment Texas Republicans Hate Cities Transit in Austin Walking in Austin (Pedestrian Issues) When Neighborhoods Go Bad

Why Central Austinites Should Support Toll Roads

Excerpted from a discussion on the austin-bikes email list, where one of my self-appointed burdens is to be the voice of reason towards those who live in the center-city echo chamber (where everybody bikes; where nobody wants sprawling highways; etc).

The last paragraph of my response is the most relevant piece, and the one that the person I was responding to and many other wishful thinkers just don’t get. I, thanks to moving here with suburbanites, and working with exclusively suburbanites, have learned the following painful truths:

  • There are more suburbanites around here than urbanites. A LOT more. And the most recent election, they finally WON a seat in our city council (McCracken over Clarke) DESPITE much higher turnout in the center-city.
  • Outside Austin, there are no urbanites. CAMPO is now 2/3 suburban, for instance.
  • Suburbanites cannot conceive of any lifestyle other than the suburban one. Really. I get blank stares when I tell them I rode the bus to work today, or when I say I walked to the store.
  • The sheer population and geographical coverage of suburban neighborhoods means that even if gas gets really expensive, they’re still going to be living there. Resistance to their redevelopment in ways which aren’t so car-dependent and the cost of such modifications means we’re stuck with what we have now for at least a few more decades. Yes, even at $5.00/gallon.

Here’s the thread:

Roger Baker wrote:
> On Mar 4, 2005, at 9:34 AM, Mike Dahmus wrote:
>
>     Roger Baker wrote:
>
>         McCracken is the immediate hero here, but he likely wouldn't
>         have done it without Sal Costello, SOSA, and all the
>         independent grassroots organizing.
>
>         On CAMPO, McCracken's resolution got defeated about 2 to 1,
>         with Gerald Daugherty on the bad side, along with CAMPO
>         Director Aulick. TxDOT's Bob Daigh deserves a special bad
>         actor award for expressing his opinion just before the CAMPO
>         vote, with no reasons given, that any independent study of the
>         CAMPO plan would be likely to threaten TxDOT funding for our
>         area. -- Roger
>
>
>     Just like the transit people in Austin with Mike Krusee, you've
>     been completely snookered if you think these people are your friends.
>     The goal of McCracken et al is NOT to stop building these roads;
>     it is to build these roads quickly as FREE HIGHWAYS.
>     In other words, McCracken and Costello ___ARE___ THE ROAD LOBBY!
>     Keep that in mind, folks. Slusher and Bill Bunch don't want the
>     roads at all, but pretty much everybody else who voted against the
>     toll plan wants to build them as free roads.
>     And these highways built free is a far worse prospect for Austin
>     and especially central Austin than if they're built as toll roads,
>     in every possible respect.
>     - MD
>
>
> All that is easy for Mike to say but, as usual, lacks any factual basis or
> documentation. Furthermore, he does not appear to read what I have previously
> documented.

(my response):

As for factual basis or documentation, it should be obvious to anybody with the awareness of a three-year-old that McCracken’s playing to his suburban constituents who WANT THESE ROADS, AND WANT THEM TO BE FREE, rather than Slusher’s environmentalist constituents, who don’t want the roads at all.

As for reading what you’ve previously documented; oh, if only it were true. If only I hadn’t wasted a good month of my life reading your repeated screeds about the oil peak which have almost convinced me to go out and buy an SUV just to spite you.

POLITICAL REALITY MATTERS. The suburban voters who won McCracken his seat over Margot Clarke WANT THESE HIGHWAYS TO BE BUILT. AND THEY DON’T WANT THEM BUILT AS TOLL ROADS BECAUSE THEY’LL HAVE TO PAY (MORE) OF THE BILL IF THEY DO.

Here’s what’s going to happen if Roger’s ilk convinces the environmental bloc to continue their unholy alliance with the suburban road warriors like McCracken and Daugherty:

  1. We tell TXDOT we don’t want toll roads.
  2. TXDOT says we need to kick in a bunch more money to get them built free.
  3. We float another huge local bond package to do it (just like we did for local ‘contributions’ for SH 45, SH 130, and US 183A).
  4. The roads get built, as free highways.
  5. Those bonds are paid back by property and sales taxes, which disproportionately hit central Austinites, and especially penalize people who don’t or only infrequently drive.

Here’s what’s going to happen if the toll roads get built, as toll roads:

  1. TXDOT builds them.
  2. The current demand for the roadway is large enough to fill the coffers enough to keep the enterprise going without the bonds defaulting.
  3. (Even if #2 doesn’t happen, we’re at worst no worse off than above; with the added bonus that suburbanites still get to finally pay user fees for their trips on the roads).

Here’s what’s going to happen in Roger Fantasyland:

  1. McCracken, Gerald Daugherty, et al have a Come To Jesus moment and decide that we Really Don’t Need Any More Highways In The ‘Burbs.

Now, be honest. Which one of the three scenarios above do you find least likely?

YES, EVEN IF GAS TRIPLES IN PRICE, SUBURBANITES WILL STILL DRIVE. THE OIL PEAK IN THIS SENSE DOESN’T ****MATTER****. The people out there in Circle C aren’t going anywhere in the short term, and it’ll be decades before their neighborhoods are redeveloped in a less car-dependent fashion, assuming we can afford to.

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Austin Bicycling in Austin Don't Hurt Us Mr. Krusee, We'll Do Whatever You Want Driving in Austin Personal Transit in Austin Walking in Austin (Pedestrian Issues)

Observations from a car-less week

So I’ve spent all week without the car – on Monday, I biked to work (my stepson and I rode our bikes west to Casis, and then I rode all the way in to work – and boy was it tiring; I’m very out of shape); so out-of-shape that I ended up taking the bus home. Then, Tuesday, the car wouldn’t start. Since then, we’ve learned that the alternator broke and supercharged the (nearly dead) battery and nearly done blowed it up. The garage still hasn’t figured out how to make it work, so I’ve been busing it ever since (including today).

Big deal, huh? Well, son, I work in northwest Austin in the software bidness. (My last job had two offices; both about 5 miles west of 360 on 2244 and 2222 respectively; this one is at least in the 183 corridor).

This is my second long stretch in Austin without a car – I went for two weeks without my old convertible at my last job and had to bike in 8 days in a row (a much more difficult bike commute than I have now, but I was in better shape then too) – the bus is not an option in that part of town – closest bus stop to the office was more than five miles away. The office at my current job is far more favorable for bus use – I can use either the express buses or the #3, both of which I board at 38th and Medical Parkway. The express bus drops me off 5 minutes (by foot) to the north of my office and the #3 drops me off 5 minutes south – when I’m early to the bus stop I’ll often take a #3 which takes longer but arrives slightly earlier, for instance.

Most days this week, I took the “express” bus (983 or 983 depending on which way). The trip into work consists of a 15-minute walk to the bus stop (except for the day my wife dropped me off on her way to Casis); a 20-minute bus ride; and the 5-minute walk to work. Not too bad compared to a 15-minute drive — basically the walk makes it worthwhile. The problem is the trip home – the bus takes considerably longer due to Mopac traffic, and is even less reliable than the car (and of course in the car you can escape Mopac at a couple of places and try to make up some time).

Anyways, the work commute: not bad. Could I do this every day? Yes. I’d use the bike more (if nothing more than to get home quicker from the bus stop). I’d have to get better rain gear (I got rained on the most the day I biked, ironically).

But am I saving money on the work commute right now? Not unless we completely get rid of that car. The fare for the express bus is $1.00 each way ($0.50 for the slower #3 bus which I could also take). Half-price ticket booklets bring it down to $1.00 round-trip. This calculator shows how much this daily trip really costs in my car, once you dispense with the fiction that you should amortize fixed costs like insurance and maintenance over each trip. Even with half-price tickets, I save a whopping eight cents a day.

Now, what about getting rid of the car entirely? Now we’re talking, especially since the cost of repairs (so far) are almost what I consider this car worth in total. Well, experience from this week shows that we’re almost, but not quite, ready to be a one-car household.

  • Work commute: See above. No problem, basically; I could do it.
  • School trips: Every other week, my stepson lives at our house, and has to be taken to school in the morning. I could bike more often with him, but not every day (we can’t even do two consecutive days now since my wife picks him up in a car which can’t take his bike home). Next year? Probably stops being an impediment as he moves on to middle school at either O’Henry or Kealing, both of which lie on the combined 21/22 bus route (which he’ll be taking anyways even if we remain a 2-car family). I f we had planned ahead a little more, he could probably be doing this now (the bus runs right by Casis too), but I plan on riding with him at least a few times first, and haven’t done it yet.
  • After-work appointments: This was the big problem. My wife has a weekly meeting at 5:30 on Wednesdays, for which I have to be home at 5:10 to watch the baby. There’s no way to do this feasibly taking the bus – I’d have to stop my workday at about 4:00, which is simply not going to happen in my line of work. Also, we both have a weekly meeting on Thursdays at 5:10 – same problem. This week, I went home at lunch on Wednesday and worked at home — this works for occasional emergencies, but not as a regular thing. On Thursday, she had to get the babysitter earlier than usual and come pick me up. Also not going to work as a regular thing.

We’ve failed on the Thursday meeting in the sense that we acquired a regular engagement which I can’t get to on the bus. I could theoretically bike there in about 20 minutes — but this is not the type of thing I can do all sweaty. I don’t know if anything other than opting out could fix Wednesday.

So we’re repairing the car this time, and I’ll continue to wish I didn’t have to. We’re looking at at least $500 in repairs (on a car I figure is worth $500-$1000), about $400/year in insurance, about $200/year in various other fixed costs. All for two lousy meetings a week.

That’s what you get when you have a half-assed transit system — people who in other cities could live with just one car (and wouldn’t mind doing so) can’t even do it. Unfortunately, nothing but massive densification of the urban core could solve this problem for us, and even then, Capital Metro hoodwinked enough people with the commuter rail debacle such that the urban core of Austin won’t have competitive transit service for essentially ever. C’est la car.

11:00 update: Now the engine computer needs to be replaced. Bare minimum, if we do it through the shop and use refurb parts: another $500 for a total of $1000. Argh. My wife is checking now to find out how much we’re already on the hook for if we bail, and then I get to go price cheap used cars. Hooray for economic disaster! Man, I hate cars.

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Bicycling in Austin Personal Walking in Austin (Pedestrian Issues)

dribs and drabs

I still mean to write a full follow-up to the comments on the last piece.

I biked to work today (after biking with my stepson to his school). The new bike lanes on Jollyville appear not to have been striped as per the engineering diagrams I saw (the lanes should disappear a ways back of the major intersections; and they don’t). They’re full of gravel, but I suspect the wide lanes would be too at this point. Too early to tell on that account.

I walked to the McDonald’s across Braker today (following this path) and actually passed a cow orker headed the other direction with a sub from Subway!

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Austin Personal Republicans Hate Poor People Republicans Hate Public Transportation Republicans Hate The Environment Texas Republicans Hate Cities Transit in Austin Walking in Austin (Pedestrian Issues)

Pedestrian problems on US 183

183 sidewalk photo essay

Prentiss appeared to have beat me to the punch on the photo-essay thing, but I have archives of this very blog that prove that my photo essay on pedestrian problems on US 183 was planned much earlier, and simply took longer to implement since I’m far far far lazier than he is. I’m frankly amazed I ever got it done. Thanks, slow day at work!

ALSO ALSO ALSO! This is the ONE HUNDREDTH ENTRY in this crackpot blog! Somebody put on a party hat or something, please.