Half A Bridge

A reasonable person replied to a posting I made about Capital Metro’s commuter rail plan (in particular to its requirement that shuttle buses be used for the last leg of their journey):

“A very good point Mike, and important one.
Isn’t this something that will be phased in as ridership grows, if possible.”

This pretty much sums up the reason Capital Metro has succeeded so far in maintaining what urban support they currently have. Most people aren’t looking at the rail system as a potential passenger – they’re buying into the “build anything and people will use it” theory pushed so ineffectively in voluntary air-quality agreements that always end up with the same set of city officials behind them. If you believe some non-trivial set of people will ride it just because it’s there, then this attitude makes sense.

However, there’s another way to look at the line (and its extension to Congress Avenue). Let’s suppose that we decide to build a new bridge halfway across Town Lake. Why only halfway? Well, the first half of the bridge is going to be pretty cheap because a bunch of old but serviceable pylons (supports) happen to already be there – all we need to do is lay decking on top of them. (The pylons for the second half of the bridge do not currently exist). Certain unidentified crackpot transportation writers claim that this isn’t enough; and that nobody will use the bridge (except for a couple of people who like to dive into the water for the end of their commute).

Would you say that building such a bridge is a good idea, just because it’s so cheap? Would you say that we should build the first half, and then see how many people use it, before we bother to build the second half? “Let’s ride and then decide” indeed.